Discontinued Products

Coffee Logs

Coffee Logs were made from a mix of sawdust and used coffee grounds. Ther were a popular and nice burning briquette but sadly the company that produced them went into administration.

Coffee Log alternatives:


Two RUF birch briquettes blocks - Wood Fuel Co-operative

RUF Oak / RUF Blocks

We ususally have at least one RUF briquette in stock, but our suppliers for these do change, as it’s difficult to source supplies that can keep up with our demand at a reasonable price.

RUF Oak/Block alternatives:


a bundle of oak pini-Wood Fuel Coop

Oak Pini-Kay

Oak pini-kay have been replaced by BushBlok pini kay.

Oak Pini-Kay alternatives:


oak cobs - Wood Fuel Coop

Hardwood Discs

Hardwood Discs were small 50mm diameter cobs made using the pure wood byproduct from a bespoke joinery business in Worcestershire. They were unfortunately a one-off as the producers do not make large quantities. We will not be re-stocking them in future.

Hardwood Disc alternatives:


Miscanthus Fire Logs a bag of fuel cobs made from dried miscanthus Wood Fuel Co-operative

Miscanthus Fire Logs

A UK product, Miscanthus Fire Logs were made from a type of perennial grass that grows from rizomes. The manufacturer ceased production and we will not be re-stocking them in future.

Miscanthus Fire Logs alternatives:


XL Ruf heat blocks measurements stacked woodfuel co-operative

XL RUF Briquettes

XL RUF briquettes were a fantastic long burning briquette.Their chunky size made them suitable for larger stoves. Unfortunately, the suppliers were unable to keep us stocked and so we are unable to get them anymore.

XL RUF Briquettes alternatives:

There are no direct alternatives but a variety of our current products can do similar things:


envirobrick loose woodsure ready to burn woodfuel cooperative

Enviro-Bricks

Enviro-Bricks are made from clean, kiln-dried sawdust from a hardwood component manufacturer in the USA. We haven’t discontinued them but they are almost impossible to source due to transport issues in the USA. We will keep trying though, so watch this space.

Enviro-Bricks alternatives:

There are no direct alternatives but a variety of our current products can do similar things:


Three oak-tagon heat logs briquettes heatlogs - Wood Fuel Co-operative

Oak-tagon

Oak-tagon were made from pure oak, ash and chestnut sawdust, which is quite fine and so produces a very dense, dust-free briquette.

Sadly, Oak-tagon were one of the products we lost after the Ukraine war started. A lot of firewood products came through Ukraine but it has become increasingly difficult to verify origin and legality of timber. This has essentially closed the door on all briquettes and logs from this region.

Oak-tagon alternatives:


A bag of Blazers heat logs - Wood Fuel Coop

Blazers

Blazers were excellent softwood briquettes, made in Wales from 100% virgin timber, sustainably sourced in the UK.

Blazers had production issues for a few years before they finally ceased production. We would love to stock them again but sadly it doesn’t look likely that production will resume any time soon.

Blazers alternatives:


energo top large heat logs loose woodfuel cooperative

Energo Top

Energo Top briquettes were a top of the range, extremely dense nestro made from clean de-barked pine. They are the closest we’ve found yet to our famous Beech Nestro.

Energo Top were one of the products we lost after the Ukraine war started. These briquettes came from the Czech Republic but it has become increasingly difficult to verify origin and legality of timber from Europe. This has essentially closed the door on all briquettes and logs from this region.

Energo Top alternatives:


Three nestro briquette heat logs - Wood Fuel Co-operative

Eco Nestro

Eco-Nestro were a great value briquette, made from slow grown spruce and pine.

Eco Nestro came from Russia, so it is clearly not available anymore and will not be returning in the future.

Eco Nestro alternatives:


dragon's teeth briquettes heat logs pack - Wood Fuel Coop

Dragon’s Teeth

Dragon’s Teeth briquettes were a dense hardwood/softwood mix briquette, produced by a timber & stair construction company in Wales.

Sadly, the manufacturer could not produce enough product to supply us, so we will not be getting them back in stock.

Don’t worry, we have a great alternative RUF, which is also made in the UK.

Dragon’s Teeth alternatives:


Extralong Bark Overnight Logs 10kg pack Bark Briquettes. Night Briquettes. Woodfuel Co-operative

Extralong

Extralong Bark Logs were are made from a mixture of clean dry softwood bark together with slow grown pine.

This combination provides an excellent balance between a long slow burn and a pleasant flame with good heat characteristics.

Extralong were one of the products we lost after the Ukraine war started. These briquettes came from the Czech Republic but it has become increasingly difficult to verify origin and legality of timber from Europe. This has essentially closed the door on all briquettes and logs from this region.

Extralong alternatives:


baby beech heat logs briquettes loose woodfuel cooperative

Baby Beech / Baby Energo

Baby Beech were a lovely, dust free briquette made from pure beech sawdust. Baby Energo were their softwood equivalent

Both of these products were lost after the Ukraine war started. These briquettes were made in Ukraine and production was halted by the Russian invasion. We will not be able to stock them again in future.

Baby Beech alternatives:


Energo Hard Top

Energo Hard Top were a large, hardwood nestro briquette.

This product became unavailable after the Ukraine war started. We will not be able to stock them again in future.

Energo Hard Top alternatives:


A stack of pizza briquettes - Wood Fuel Co-operative

Pizza Briquettes

Pizza Briquettes were a beech briquette produced in Italy.

They were a nice product but expensive and we found better alternatives, which work equally well in log-fired ovens.

Pizza Briquette alternatives:


Peat Nuggets and Peat Briquettes

We no longer stock any peat products. This decision was taken primarily for environmental reasons, where we could no longer justify selling a product which causes so much environmental damage.

To find out more about our decision, please see our Environmental Responsibility statement.

Peat alternatives:

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Quick guide to choosing the best Wood Fuel for your stove and lifestyle.

Wood Fuel Co-operative
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*Break - We strongly recommend you break these briquettes in half (or less for very small stoves) because they do expand whilst burning and you don't want them to overfill the fire.
*Easy to light - We always use a Firelighter and Kindling Sticks to start our fires. Most briquettes are graded four stars to light because they are quite dense and require kindling.

Notes:

  • All stove and flue combinations tend to have different burning characteristics. Fuel that works well in my stove may not work so well in your stove, and vice-versa.
  • Most modern stoves are more efficient than most older stoves, meaning a modern quality stove will burn fuel more economically and generate more heat over a longer period.
  • Always try to burn fuel with a 'lick of flame'. Smouldering fuel to try to extend burn time is bad for your stove, flue and the environment due to unburned particulate matter in the smoke.
  • Be prepared to break briquettes into smaller sections to fit into your stove comfortably. Many briquettes do expand whilst burning and you don't want them to expand onto the glass.
  • The chart above indicates which briquettes are easy to break. Some are small enough so they don't need breaking. This makes for a cleaner environment around your stove.
  • All briquettes, except Everyday Value and Hotmax, benefit hugely from using kindling to light them. I suggest five kindling sticks will be sufficient, meaning a net should last 30 days.

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