Blog | Information & Inspiration

 

Storing your briquettes

Find out more of our do's and don't for storing your briquettes.

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5 Top Tips

Get to know our top tips for your wood fuel.

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How to start your fire with briquettes

Read our easy how to guide on starting your fire with briquettes.

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Burning Wet Logs

Lots of you will have heard the news that the Government plan to phase out the sale of wet wood and bagged house coal by February 2021.

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Plant a Tree… For Wildlife and People

For every one tonne of wood briquettes we sell, we plant one native tree in the UK.

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Which is the best briquette?

If only there were an easy answer to this! The honest, annoying answer is: it depends.

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Can I burn briquettes in a wood burning stove?

We often hear people say, "My stove installer says I can only burn logs in my stove, so I can't use briquettes".

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What should I do if I have sick wild birds in my garden?

If you’ve seen sick wild birds in your garden, especially ones who are lethargic, unusually tame seeming or fluffed up, then you need to take action.

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Imported vs UK Pellets

identical, in our experience customer feedback has always been that UK wood pellets are less dusty and more consistent.

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Should I feed garden birds all year?

You really should feed garden birds all year. We now know that birds really struggle to find enough food throughout the year – not just during winter.

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Why Feed Wild Birds?

While our wild garden birds should be able to fend for themselves without our help, evidence shows that they’re not managing to.

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Wood fuel sustainability

Wood fuel sustainability is becoming a concern as worldwide we're using more biomass boilers and wood-burning stoves than ever before.

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What are briquettes?

Briquettes are becoming more popular in the UK but there is still plenty of confusion about what they actually are.

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Delivering Wood Fuel in Edinburgh

Like many UK cities, Edinburgh has a growing number of wood burning stoves being installed and we deliver wood fuel in Edinburgh regularly.

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Which briquette to choose?

Customers often walk into our depot and are amazed at the number of different fuels on display, particularly briquettes, of which there may be up to a dozen different types at any one time.

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Hobbit Soup

A cold, wet Sunday and the floodwaters are rising, but here in Hobbitland there's a warm, delicious aroma and the promise of hot soup soon!

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Why burn briquettes on your stove?

On 10th October 2015 there was an excellent article, written by Miles Brignall, in The Guardian.

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Explaining wood briquettes to guests

It's fun when a new visitor to the house spots the log basket next to the stove.

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The dangers of burning damp wood

What are the dangers of burning damp wood? We are sometimes asked why we don't sell more logs rather than briquettes.

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Patio briquette burners beat midges!

We had our first barbecue of the summer the other night and all went well until the wind dropped.

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Revolutionary! This fuel will transform heating…

OK, we thought the blocks were good...but that was before we trialled the revolutionary softwood and hardwood log briquettes!

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The Heating Revolution…wood blocks rock!

A Heating Revolution! The perfect fuel for a woodstove is very dry, gives off plenty of heat, burns for a long time and is very affordable.

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Merry Christmas from the Wood Fuel Co-op!

Christmas is fast approaching and the fuel is flying out of the door!

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The gift of warmth for Christmas

Looking for an original and very practical Christmas gift for someone with an open fire or a multifuel stove?

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Quick guide to choosing the best Wood Fuel for your stove and lifestyle.

Wood Fuel Co-operative
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*Break - We strongly recommend you break these briquettes in half (or less for very small stoves) because they do expand whilst burning and you don't want them to overfill the fire.
*Easy to light - We always use a Firelighter and Kindling Sticks to start our fires. Most briquettes are graded four stars to light because they are quite dense and require kindling.

Notes:

  • All stove and flue combinations tend to have different burning characteristics. Fuel that works well in my stove may not work so well in your stove, and vice-versa.
  • Most modern stoves are more efficient than most older stoves, meaning a modern quality stove will burn fuel more economically and generate more heat over a longer period.
  • Always try to burn fuel with a 'lick of flame'. Smouldering fuel to try to extend burn time is bad for your stove, flue and the environment due to unburned particulate matter in the smoke.
  • Be prepared to break briquettes into smaller sections to fit into your stove comfortably. Many briquettes do expand whilst burning and you don't want them to expand onto the glass.
  • The chart above indicates which briquettes are easy to break. Some are small enough so they don't need breaking. This makes for a cleaner environment around your stove.
  • All briquettes, except Everyday Value and Hotmax, benefit hugely from using kindling to light them. I suggest five kindling sticks will be sufficient, meaning a net should last 30 days.

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